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The Murderess - A heart-stopping story of family love passion and betrayal - cover

The Murderess - A heart-stopping story of family love passion and betrayal

Jennifer Wells

Publisher: Aria

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Summary

The Murderess is a heart-stopping story of family, love, passion and betrayal set against the backdrop of war-ravaged Britain. Perfect for fans of Lesley Pearse and Dilly Court. 
 
1931: Fifteen-year-old Kate witnesses her mother Millicent push a stranger from a station platform into the path of an oncoming train. There was no warning, seemingly no reason, and absolutely no remorse. 
 
1940: Exactly nine years later, Kate returns to the station and notices a tramp laying flowers on the exact spot that the murder was committed;the identity of the victim, still remains unknown. 
 
With a country torn apart by war and her family estate and name in tatters, Kate has nothing to lose as she attempts to uncover family secrets that date back to the Great War and solve a mystery that blights her family name. 
 
'Engrossing, un-put-downable and heartwrenching!' Faith Hogan.

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