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Solid Seasons - The Friendship of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson - cover

Solid Seasons - The Friendship of Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson

Jeffrey S Cramer

Publisher: Counterpoint

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Summary

Author is the Curator of Collections at the Walden Woods Project's Thoreau Institute at Walden Woods Library
Published in time for Ralph Waldo Emerson's birthday (May 25th)
As never before revealed, the nuance and moving depth of friendship between two of the most beloved and stalwart giants of American Letters, Emerson and Thoreau 
With a special, "tall" trim size at 5in x 9in

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