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Reflections of the Shadow - Creating Memorable Heroes and Villains for Film and TV - cover

Reflections of the Shadow - Creating Memorable Heroes and Villains for Film and TV

Jeffrey Hirschberg

Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions

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Summary

Using examples from contemporary films, Hirschberg explores the commonalitiesamong heroes and villains who have stood the test of time.

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