Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Best Tennis of Your Life - 50 Mental Strategies For Fearless Performance - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 500,000 other books you can enjoy!

The Best Tennis of Your Life - 50 Mental Strategies For Fearless Performance

Jeff Greenwald

Publisher: Betterway Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Play with Freedom...And Win More! 
The Best Tennis of Your Life is an inspirational and practical guide that will help players of all levels finally master the mental game. Author Jeff Greenwald draws from his unique background as a world-class player, sports psychology consultant, psychotherapist, and former coach to provides 50 specific tools you can immediately apply in any match situation. 
This comprehensive guide will show you how to:Embrace nerves and play even better under pressureMaintain confidence to win more consistentlyDevelop a pin-point focusAccess an ideal level of intensityPlay with a renewed sense of passion and freedom 
 Why wait any longer to play the best tennis of your life? Get the mental edge with this invaluable resource and watch your game soar.
Available since: 11/13/2007.

Other books that might interest you

  • Boys of Winter - Life and Death in the US Ski Troops During the Second World War - cover

    Boys of Winter - Life and Death...

    Charles J. Sanders

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “An immensely valuable and substantial addition to 10th Mountain literature and to the history of skiing in the United States.” —International Ski History Association  The Boys of Winter tells the true story of three young American ski champions and their brutal, heroic, and fateful transformation from athletes to infantrymen with the 10th Mountain Division. Charles J. Sanders’s fast-paced narrative draws on dozens of interviews and extensive research to trace these boys’ lives from childhood to championships and from training at Mount Rainier and in the Colorado Rockies to battles against the Nazis.  “The Boys of Winter perfectly captures the spirit of the men who made the division what it was, as well as the spirit of those troopers who survived to help shape the postwar world.” —John Imbrie, 10th Mountain Division historian and coeditor of Good Times and Bad Times  “Focusing on the lives, and the deaths, of three young men from vastly different backgrounds, Sanders traces the history of the U.S. Army’s Tenth Mountain Division from its inception, training in Washington and Colorado, first blooding in the Aleutians, and finally, to deployment to Italy in 1945 . . . The Boys of Winter is a sensitive tribute.” —Western Historical Quarterly  “Sanders distills the complicated and years-long saga of the creation of America’s ski troops into an intensely personal story . . . [And] doesn’t shy away from a question that haunts the survivors of the division, and the families of those who never returned.” —The Durango Herald
    Show book
  • Dublin & Wicklow - A Walking Guide - cover

    Dublin & Wicklow - A Walking Guide

    Helen Fairbairn

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    l show you the way! • Also by this author: 'Northern Ireland: A Walking Guide'. For a complete list of walking guides available from The Collins Press, see www.collinspress.ie
    Show book
  • Play It Again! - Duke University's 1991 NCAA Men's Basketball National Championship Run - cover

    Play It Again! - Duke...

    Bob Harris, Mike Waters

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Play It Again!, with voice of the Blue Devils Bob Harris and color commentator Mike Waters, features radio highlights from Duke University's 1991 NCAA Men's Basketball National Championship run that saw the team defeat Louisiana-Monroe, Iowa, UConn, St. John's, and exact revenge on UNLV, before beating the University of Kansas, 72-65, on April 1, 1991, in the title game. Three players from the 1991 squad (Laettner, Hurley, and Grant Hill) had their jerseys retired by Duke.
    Show book
  • Lost Tramways of Ireland – Belfast - cover

    Lost Tramways of Ireland – Belfast

    Peter Waller

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The first volume in the ‘Lost Tramways of Ireland’ series  features the history of the Belfast system, including its origins as a horse tramway in the 1870s, its conversion to electric traction in the early 20th century, its role in two World Wars, the conversion of the network to bus and trolleybus  operation from the late 1940s and the system’s eventual demise in 1954. Amongst the locations featured are Glengormley, Greencastle and Bloomfield as well as York Road and Queen’s Quay railway stations.
    Show book
  • How Football (Nearly) Came Home: Adventures in Putin’s World Cup - cover

    How Football (Nearly) Came Home:...

    Barney Ronay

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The summer of 2018: England sweltered in the most sustained heatwave for 42 years, the government tore itself apart over deals and no deals, and hundreds of miles away, in a taciturn and strange state, the national football team did the unthinkable in the World Cup: they didn’t screw it up. 
    The England team that touched down in Russia for the 2018 World Cup was a new-look outfit: there were no real stars, no overblown egos, and no dickheads. Still reeling from the wincing exit to Iceland in the 2016 Euros, expectations were at an all-time low. Qualification had been smooth if not spectacular, and pundits and fans alike were lukewarm about the team’s chances. Just avoiding embarrassment would have counted as some kind of success. As the tournament kicked off, a stunningly stage-managed occasion by Putin and his cronies at FIFA, we all took a deep inhale of breath and waited for the inevitable: technical ineptitude and crap penalties. 
    How wrong we were. Over the next three weeks, as back home we dissolved in the heat, our football team gave us reason to believe. We squeaked a win against Tunisia, trounced Panama and had a great tactical defeat to Belgium to open up the draw to the final. We all bought waistcoats and eulogised Southgate’s calm, fatherly manner. We all fell in love with ‘Slabhead’, aka Harry Maguire. And we did it all to the tune of ‘It’s Coming Home’. 
    Barney Ronay was there through the whole tournament, criss–crossing over Russia as he followed the England team, and the rest, on their quest for glory. Here, he captures the sights and sounds, the twists and turns, the bad food and the great football that contributed into making this World Cup one of the greatest of all time. 
    In this modern recreation of a historical event, Barney Ronay takes us on a special journey through the 21st century's most memorable sports event. His top-notch coaching of words and phrases makes How Football the best travel companion for any football enthusiast. 
    For fans of Jonathan Wilson (Brian Clough), David Winner (Brilliant Orange), Pete Davies (One Night in Turin), Pat Nevin (The Accidental Footballer), and Daniel Abrahams (71/72).
    Show book
  • Elusive Summits - Four expeditions in the Karakoram - cover

    Elusive Summits - Four...

    Victor Saunders

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Elusive Summits is the award winning first book by British mountaineer Victor Saunders, winner of the 1990 Boardman Tasker Prize for Mountain Literature. Documenting climbs in the 1980s, at a time when the greatest mountains in the greatest ranges had been climbed by numerous routes, collected like sets of stamps and written about extensively by the world's leading climbers, Saunders and his companions relished the exploration of the thousands of peaks in the 6000 and 7000 metre range. These slightly humbler, but often more aesthetically satisfying and no less testing summits of the Karakoram and the Himalaya, were ripe fruit for the committed alpinists of the day. Saunders describes four lightweight expeditions to the Karakoram, beginning with Uzum Brakk, or Conway's Ogre, which he visited in 1980. Along with his two climbing companions, neither of whom he knew at all well, he discovered the serious nature of Karakoram glaciers, and faced up to the violent weather that eventually beat them back on the summit ridge after they had nominally completed their route. The trio interrupted their attempt on Uzum to perform a dramatic rescue of two badly injured Japanese climbers on nearby Latok IV, and this contact led indirectly to Bojohaghur Duanasir, one of the highest unclimbed mountains in Pakistan, which became the object of the North London Mountaineering Club's attentions in 1982. Here, in the company of such friends and climbing partners as Mick Fowler, the joy of new route finding on an unclimbed 7000-metre peak outweighed the perilous bivoua and torture by lightening. 1983 offered a rare chance to join Indian climbers on the front line of the Indian-Pakistan border conflict across the Siachen Glacier. The pleasure of solving intricate technical problems with Stephen Venables high above the firing line was brought to an abrupt end by a dropped rucksack which caused an epic descent from just below the then unclimbed summit of Rimo. The fourth expedition was an attempt on the stunning peak of Spantik. First glimpsed from Bojohaghur, this a mountain whose awe-inspiring Golden Pillar, soaring 4000 feet to the summit ridge, demanded attention. Saunders' ascent in 1987 with Mick Fowler, and subsequent pitch-by-grunt account, proved to be one of the most exciting and difficult ascents of the decade by British alpinists. Saunders communicates the highs and lows of expedition life with relish, good humour, honest trepidation and a keen eye for the idiosyncratic among his companions. Elusive Summits is a wonderful celebration of the sheer exhilaration that comes from the hardest level of alpine-style exploration in the Karakoram.
    Show book