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Hell Gate - cover

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Hell Gate

Jeff Dawson

Publisher: Canelo Adventure

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Summary

To solve this case, only an outsider will do… Ingo Finch faces his biggest challenge yet.New York, 1904 – over a thousand are dead after the sinking of the General Slocum, a pleasure steamer full of German immigrants out for a day on the East River. The community is devastated, broken, in uproar.With a populist senator preying on their grievances, a new political force is unleashed, pushing America to ally with Germany in any coming war.Nine months later, Ingo Finch arrives in Manhattan, now an official British agent. Tasked with exposing this new movement, he is caught in a deadly game between Whitehall, Washington, Berlin… and the Mob.Not everything in the Big Apple is as it seems. For Finch, completing the mission is one thing; surviving it quite another…An unputdownable story of anarchists, Feds, gangs and Gilded Age mystery, the third thrilling instalment of the Ingo Finch crime series is perfect for fans of Abir Mukherjee, Philip Kerr and C J Sansom.Praise for Hell Gate'Riveting and beautifully written' Alex Gerlis, author of the Richard Prince Thrillers'A well-written and compelling thriller ... The pace never lets up. A very strong spy story' Sarah Ward, author of the DC Childs Mysteries'A fantastic writer' Making the Cut podcast
Available since: 11/05/2020.
Print length: 256 pages.

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