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Please Don't Eat the Daisies - cover

Please Don't Eat the Daisies

Jean Kerr

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

The “refreshing . . . laugh-out-loud” #1 New York Times bestseller about life in the suburbs that was adapted into a classic film comedy (Kirkus Reviews).   One day, Tony Award–winning playwright Jean Kerr packed up her four kids (and husband, Walter, one of Broadway’s sharpest critics), and left New York City. They moved to a faraway part of the world that promised a grassy utopia where daisies grew wild and homes were described as neo-gingerbread. In this collection of “wryly observant” essays, Kerr chronicles her new life in this strange land called Larchmont (TheWashington Post).   It sounds like bliss—no more cramped apartments and nightmarish after-theater cocktail parties where the martinis were never dry enough. Now she has her very own washer/dryer, a garden, choice seats at the hottest new third-grade school plays (low overhead but they’ll never recoup their losses), and a fresh new kind of lunacy.   In Please Don’t Eat the Daisies “Jean Kerr cooks with laughing gas” as she explores the everyday absurdities, anxieties, and joys of marriage, family, friends, home decorating, and maintaining a career—but this time with a garage! (Time).

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