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My Elusive Earl - cover

My Elusive Earl

Jean Hart Stewart

Publisher: MuseItUp Publishing

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Summary

The Earl of Cade had given up the battle of his emotions. Travis had fought as hard as he was able and lost. He knew beyond doubt that Elizabeth would always be lodged in his heart. He’d made the decision to keep her near him but vowed she would never have the least inkling of how strongly he desired her. 
Never knowing when another painful health crisis would strike again, he reinforced the knowledge he could never marry. 
But Elizabeth has her eyes set on him. Will he be able to resist her charms?

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