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American Politics - Occam's Razor Series #2 - cover

American Politics - Occam's Razor Series #2

JD Lovil

Publisher: JD Lovil Publishing

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Summary

Politics is a mess. 
If we want our country to survive, we have to find some solutions. Let's argue about it, apply Occam's Razor to figure out the best solutions, and get it done! 
If you are concerned about immigration, social programs, or freedom in general, you need to read this book. It might give you something to think about. 
Get this book now, and start your quest to find the answers.

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