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Journal of the Dead - A Story of Friendship and Murder in the New Mexico Desert - cover

Journal of the Dead - A Story of Friendship and Murder in the New Mexico Desert

Jason Kersten

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

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Summary

I killed and buried my best friend today ... 
When authorities found Raffi Kodikian -- barely alive -- four days after he and his friend David Coughlin became lost in Rattlesnake Canyon, they made a grim and shocking discovery. Kodikian freely admitted that he had stabbed Coughlin twice in the heart. Had there been a darker motive than mercy? And how could anyone, under any circumstances, kill his best friend? 
Armed with the journal Kodikian and Coughlin carried into Rattle- snake Canyon, Jason Kersten re-creates in riveting detail those fateful days that led to the killing in an infamously unforgiving wilderness.

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