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The Mexican Dueña - The dream of a new life in Mexico is shattered by the unexpected actions of landowners events take a dramatic turn for all involved - cover

The Mexican Dueña - The dream of a new life in Mexico is shattered by the unexpected actions of landowners events take a dramatic turn for all involved

Jasmina Nevada

Publisher: Escondido Nevada Productions

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Summary

Based on a true story. Two señoritas return to a tropical location in search of land or a house to buy or rent, to escape the wintry conditions in their own country. However, all does not go to plan, and they face unexpected events, which they could not have envisaged.

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