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Northanger Abbey - cover

Northanger Abbey

Jane Austen

Publisher: Charles River Editors

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Summary

Larnaca Press makes the world’s greatest literature available at the touch of a button for less than a dollar, and every book has a linked table of contents to make reading easier. 

Northanger Abbey was the first novel published by Jane Austen.  The book follows the adventures of young Catherine Morland who goes to the town of Bath with her wealthy neighbors.

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