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The Dust of Everyday Life - An Epic Poem of the Pacific Northwest - cover

The Dust of Everyday Life - An Epic Poem of the Pacific Northwest

Jana Harris

Publisher: Open Road Distribution

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Summary

Spanning the years 1853–1933—beginning with conveyance by oxcart and ending with air travel—this series of dramatic monologues tells the story of Helen Walsh and Thomas Hodgson, whose families trekked the trails of the great migration to the West. Helen and Thomas get married, and together, tame the remote corners of the wilderness by means of their imperishable love and a clear, well-beaten path.
Available since: 08/04/2015.

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