Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Let the People In - The Life and Times of Ann Richards - cover

Let the People In - The Life and Times of Ann Richards

Jan Reid

Publisher: University of Texas Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

This intimate biography of the pioneering Texas governor is “required reading for political junkies—and for women considering a life in politics” (Booklist). 
 
When Ann Richards delivered the keynote of the 1988 Democratic National Convention and mocked President Bush—“Poor George, he can’t help it. He was born with a silver foot in his mouth”—she became an instant celebrity and triggered a rivalry that would alter the course of history. In 1990, she won the governorship of Texas, becoming the first ardent feminist elected to high office in America. Richards opened pathways for greater diversity in public service, and her achievements created a legacy that transcends her tenure in office. 
 
In Let the People In, Jan Reid offers an intimate portrait of Ann Richards’s remarkable rise to power as a liberal Democrat in a deeply conservative state. Reid draws on his long friendship with Richards, as well as interviews with family, personal correspondence, and extensive research to tell the story of Richards’s life, from her youth in Waco, through marriage and motherhood, her struggle with alcoholism, and her shocking encounters with Lyndon Johnson and Jimmy Carter. 
 
Reid shares the inside story of Richards’s rise from county office to the governorship, as well as her score-settling loss of the governorship to George W. Bush. Reid also describes Richards’s final years as a mentor to a new generation of public servants, including Hillary Clinton.
Available since: 10/03/2012.
Print length: 497 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Romance Regrets - True Tales of Missed Opportunity of Love - cover

    Romance Regrets - True Tales of...

    Leroy Vincent

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Romance Regrets is a book full of true stories of real people’s tales about Missed Opportunity of Love experiences. This book is great for anyone looking to remember those moments of regret.
    Show book
  • Becoming King - Martin Luther King Jr and the Making of a National Leader - cover

    Becoming King - Martin Luther...

    Troy Jackson

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    This biography sheds new light on King’s development as a civil rights leader in Montgomery among activists such as Rosa Parks, E.D. Nixon, and others.   In Becoming King, Troy Jackson demonstrates how Martin Luther King's early years as a pastor and activist in Montgomery, Alabama, helped shape his identity as a civil rights leader. Using the sharp lens of Montgomery's struggle for racial equality to investigate King's burgeoning leadership, Jackson explores King's ability to connect with people across racial and class divides. In particular, Jackson highlights King's alliances with Jo Ann Robinson, a young English professor at Alabama State University; E. D. Nixon, a middle-aged Pullman porter and head of the local NAACP chapter; and Virginia Durr, a courageous white woman who bailed Rosa Parks out of jail.   Drawing on countless interviews and archival sources, Jackson offers a comprehensive analysis of King’s speeches before, during, and after the Montgomery bus boycott. He demonstrates how King's voice and message evolved to reflect the shared struggles, challenges, experiences, and hopes of the people with whom he worked. Jackson also reveals the internal discord that threatened the movement's hard-won momentum and compelled King to position himself as a national figure, rising above the quarrels to focus on greater goals.
    Show book
  • The Lizard King - The True Crimes and Passions of the World's Greatest Reptile Smugglers - cover

    The Lizard King - The True...

    Bryan Christy

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Freelance writer Bryan Christy's The Lizard King "is a wild, woolly, finny, feathery and scaly account of animal smuggling on a grand scale" (New York Times). For one U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agent, stopping the dealings of a notorious snake trader became a personal crusade.
    Show book
  • Murder Lies and Cover-Ups - Who Killed Marilyn Monroe JFK Michael Jackson Elvis Presley and Princess Diana? - cover

    Murder Lies and Cover-Ups - Who...

    David Gardner

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “A riveting read that exposes the dark underbelly of Hollywood and the real stories behind the most talked about deaths in modern times.” —Caroline Graham, author of Camilla: The King’s Mistress 
     
    These five deaths stopped the whole world in its tracks. We all famously recall where we were and what we were doing when JFK was assassinated, as well as the moments Elvis, Princess Diana, and Michael Jackson died. As for Marilyn Monroe, the candle flickered out long ago, but only now can the truth be told about how—and why—she died.  
     
    After combing through thousands of recently declassified FBI files and interviewing key witnesses, crime analysts, and forensic experts during years of research, investigative writer David Gardner has unearthed new information that will transform the way we look at these iconic tragedies that have long fascinated and intrigued the general public. Murder, Lies, and Cover-Ups reveals that Elvis Presley died not as a self-obsessed caricature but as a genuine hero who may have signed his death warrant going undercover for the FBI; how Marilyn Monroe’s secret affairs with JFK and his brother, Robert, left her in the crosshairs of a lethal conspiracy; why Princess Diana’s death was no accident; who ordered President John F. Kennedy’s assassination; and how on three occasions Michael Jackson “died” of painkiller drug overdoses in the months before his death.  
     
    In the wake of new evidence and testimonies, Murder, Lies, and Cover-Ups provides many of the answers that have been elusive for so long, while explaining what it was about these enduring legends that made their legacies burn so bright. 
     
    “A fascinating book.” —Allan Hall, author of Girl in the Cellar
    Show book
  • Mahatma Gandhi - The Most Famous Political Activist of India - cover

    Mahatma Gandhi - The Most Famous...

    Kelly Mass

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was an Indian attorney, anti-colonial patriot, and political ethicist who used nonviolent resistance to lead the triumphant struggle for India's independence from British rule, motivating civil liberties and liberty movements around the globe. The epithet Mahtm (which means "great-souled" or "age-old" in Sanskrit) was at first appointed to him in South Africa in the year 1914 and is now used all across the world. 
    Gandhi was born into a Hindu family in seaside Gujarat and studied law at the Inner Temple in London. 
    In the year 1893, he came to South Africa to represent an Indian business owner in a case after 2 years in India, where he was not able to establish a rewarding law practice. 
    He spent the next 21 years of his life in South Africa. Gandhi raised his family here and was the first to use nonviolent resistance in a civil liberties struggle. 
    He went back to India in the year 1915, at the age of 45. He started setting in motion peasants, farmers, and city workers to fight oppression and high land taxes. Gandhi led statewide projects to reduce poverty, promote women's rights, build spiritual and ethnic amity, get rid of untouchability, and, above all, accomplish swaraj, or self-rule, after presuming management of the Indian National Congress in the year 1921. 
    Gandhi has meant much for the peace, the independence, and the culture of India, as well as his acts of non-violent resistance that have influenced the world. Let’s take a look at what else he did.
    Show book
  • Moab Is My Washpot - A Memoir - cover

    Moab Is My Washpot - A Memoir

    Stephen Fry

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    This international bestseller is an “enormously entertaining” boyhood memoir by the British actor and comedian (The New York Times).   Since his PBS television debut in Blackadder, multitalented writer, actor, and comedian Stephen Fry has earned many fans with his idiosyncratic wit. In this memoir, a number-one bestseller in Britain, he shares the story of his youthful years in his typical frank, funny style.   Sent to boarding school at the age of seven, he survived beatings, misery, love affairs, carnal violation, expulsion, attempted suicide, and criminal conviction to emerge—at the age of eighteen—ready to start over in a world in which he had always felt a stranger. One of very few Cambridge University graduates to have been imprisoned prior to his freshman year, Fry is “one of the great originals . . . That so much outward charm, self-awareness and intellect should exist alongside behavior that threatened to ruin the lives of the innocent victims, noble parents and Fry himself, gives the book a tragic grandeur that lifts it to classic status” (Financial Times).    
    Show book