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Blackfeet Tales of Glacier National Park - cover

Blackfeet Tales of Glacier National Park

James Willard Schultz

Publisher: DigiCat

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Summary

This is a book of stories collected from the Blackfeet Tribe from the Glacier National Park written by a man who had married a Blackfeet, lived among the people from the tribe for many years, and was considered one of them. It gives many places names in Glacier, such as just who was Running Eagle or Pitamakin, familiar to all people who visited this wonderful area. These stories are captured from oral Blackfoot tradition and tell about ancient indigenous cultures, which carry their outstanding actions to our times.
Available since: 05/28/2022.
Print length: 120 pages.

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