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The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell - Exploring Nature Love and Social Issues in Timeless Poetry - cover

The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell - Exploring Nature Love and Social Issues in Timeless Poetry

James Russell Lowell

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell showcases the diverse talents of the author, encompassing various themes such as nature, love, and social issues. Lowell's poetry is characterized by its elegant language and profound insights, reflecting the Romantic literary tradition while also providing a unique American perspective. The collection includes famous poems such as 'The Vision of Sir Launfal' and 'The First Snowfall,' highlighting Lowell's mastery of both narrative and lyric forms. With rich imagery and keen observation, Lowell's works continue to resonate with readers today, offering a glimpse into the complexities of the human experience. James Russell Lowell, a prominent 19th-century poet and critic, was known for his contributions to American literature and intellectual thought. His background in abolitionism and political activism informs his poetic works, which often engage with social justice issues and American identity. Lowell's nuanced exploration of cultural and political themes in his poetry sets him apart as a pioneer of American literary tradition. I highly recommend The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell to readers interested in exploring the intersection of literature, politics, and social commentary. Lowell's timeless poems offer a rewarding reading experience that sheds light on the cultural landscape of 19th-century America and continues to inspire readers with their enduring relevance.
Available since: 12/02/2019.
Print length: 786 pages.

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