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American Justice - A True Crime Collection - cover

American Justice - A True Crime Collection

James Neff

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

Three shocking tales of violence, intrigue, and the search for truth from a two-time Edgar Award finalist and Ann Rule’s “favorite true-crime writer.” In this riveting collection, prize-winning investigative journalist James Neff examines the Dr. Sam Sheppard murder mystery; the terrifying pursuit of a serial rapist in Cleveland, Ohio; and the spectacular rise and fall of Teamster boss Jackie Presser.  The Wrong Man: In 1954, in suburban Cleveland, Dr. Sam Sheppard’s wife, Marilyn, was beaten to death in their home. Investigators, the press, the public, and the courts worked in lockstep to convict Sheppard. Sentenced to life in prison, he served nearly a decade before he was acquitted in a retrial. Culled from DNA evidence, testimony that was never heard in court, prison diaries, and interviews with key players, The Wrong Man makes a convincing case for Sheppard’s innocence and reveals the identity of the true killer. “Gripping and meticulously researched . . . [A] first-degree murder mystery” (People).  Unfinished Murder: From 1983 to 1988, serial rapist Ronnie Shelton preyed on the women of Cleveland. Dubbed the West Side Rapist, he spied on his victims, stalked them, and brutally assaulted them in their homes. Arrested at least fifteen times for other crimes, Shelton slipped through the cracks of the justice system so often it seemed he’d never be caught—until his courageous victims united to put him behind bars. A finalist for the Edgar Award, Unfinished Murder is based on more than 150 interviews with the survivors, the police, psychiatrists, and Shelton himself, who was sentenced to 3,195 years in prison, the longest in Ohio state history.  Mobbed Up: As the president of America’s largest labor union, Jackie Presser navigated a dangerous balancing act with the Teamsters, the Mafia, and the Justice Department. At the same time he was taking orders from New York mob boss Fat Tony Salerno, Presser was serving as the FBI’s top informant on organized crime. Drawing on thousands of pages of classified files, Neff follows the trail of greed and hubris all the way to the Nixon and Reagan White Houses, where Presser was treated as a valued friend. “[A] damning tale . . . A portrait of pervasive corruption that should concern anyone who cares about the way this country works” (Los Angeles Times).

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