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Six Years With the Texas Rangers - 1875-1881 - cover

Six Years With the Texas Rangers - 1875-1881

James B. Gillett

Publisher: Enhanced Media Publishing

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Summary

Six Years with the Texas Rangers 1875 to 1881 is a history of the Texas Rangers from 1875 to 1881 written by Sergeant J.B. Gillett, a member of the Texas Rangers Hall of Fame. It is a fascinating account of one Ranger’s life attempting to maintain law and order on the Texan frontier.

“Combines all the excitement of a Western yellowback with the genuineness of a first-hand document." - Saturday Review.
Available since: 03/19/2017.

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