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Michael Brother of Jerry - cover

Michael Brother of Jerry

Jack Williamson

Publisher: Read & Co. Books

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Summary

“Michael, Brother of Jerry” is a 1917 novel by Jack London. It is the sequel to his novel “Jerry of the Islands”, which was also released in 1917. The books tell the story of the Irish Terriers Jerry and his brother Michael, who both reside on the Solomon Islands. This charming tale will appeal to dog lovers and lovers of dog literature, and it is not to be missed by those who have read and enjoyed other works by Jack London. John Griffith London (1876 – 1916), commonly known as Jack London, was an American journalist, social activist, and novelist. He was an early pioneer of commercial magazine fiction, becoming one of the first globally-famous celebrity writers who were able to earn a large amount of money from their writing. Other notable works by this author include: “The Cruise of the Dazzler” (1902), “The Kempton-Wace Letters” (1903), and “The Call of the Wild” (1903). Many vintage books such as this are increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially-commissioned new biography of the author.

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