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Yeovil History Tour - cover

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Yeovil History Tour

Jack Sweet|Robin Ansell

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

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Summary

Daniel Vickery, the editor of the Western Flying Post, wrote in A Sketch of the Town of Yeovil (1856) that 'The town is surrounded on the South East by three remarkable hills - Babylonhill, Windmill-hill [Wyndham Hill], and Newton-hill. From these several points there are prospects so rich in fertility, verdure, and beauty, and smiling prosperity - such brightness, a greenness, and a repose - that the spectator is wrapt in admiration of the view thus spread around and beneath him.' The Yeovil of today is very different from the small market town so enthusiastically described by Vickery. The 'hum of distant voices' has been replaced by the drone of motor vehicles and helicopters, and sadly the not infrequent sirens of the emergency services. In Yeovil History Tour, local authors Robin Ansell and Jack Sweet have endeavoured to take you on a fascinating tour through Yeovil, demonstrating how much the town has changed in the past 100 years.

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