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The Bridal Party - Perfect for fans of Lucy Foley's The Guest List - cover

The Bridal Party - Perfect for fans of Lucy Foley's The Guest List

J G Murray

Publisher: Corvus

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Summary

Sometimes friendship can be murder... It's the weekend of Clarisse's bridal party, a trip the girls have all been looking forward to. Then, on the day of their flight, Tamsyn, the maid of honour, suddenly backs out. Upset and confused, they try to make the most of the stunning, isolated seaside house they find themselves in. But, there is a surprise in store - Tamsyn has organised a murder mystery, a sinister game in which they must discover a killer in their midst. As tensions quickly boil over, it becomes clear to them all that there are some secrets that won't stay buried...WINNER OF THE DEVIANT MINDS CRIME THRILLER PRIZE 2018READERS LOVE THE BRIDAL PARTY!"Dark, gritty, edge of your seat, addictive reading at its best" Karen, Netgalley"A chilling, sinister, intense thriller" Nicki, Netgalley

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