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A Sportsman’s Sketches by Ivan Turgenev - Delphi Classics (Illustrated) - cover

A Sportsman’s Sketches by Ivan Turgenev - Delphi Classics (Illustrated)

Ivan Turgenev

Publisher: Delphi Classics (Parts Edition)

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Summary

This eBook features the unabridged text of ‘A Sportsman’s Sketches by Ivan Turgenev - Delphi Classics (Illustrated)’ from the bestselling edition of ‘The Collected Works of Ivan Turgenev’.  
Having established their name as the leading publisher of classic literature and art, Delphi Classics produce publications that are individually crafted with superior formatting, while introducing many rare texts for the first time in digital print. The Delphi Classics edition of Turgenev includes original annotations and illustrations relating to the life and works of the author, as well as individual tables of contents, allowing you to navigate eBooks quickly and easily.eBook features:* The complete unabridged text of ‘A Sportsman’s Sketches by Ivan Turgenev - Delphi Classics (Illustrated)’* Beautifully illustrated with images related to Turgenev’s works* Individual contents table, allowing easy navigation around the eBook* Excellent formatting of the textPlease visit www.delphiclassics.com to learn more about our wide range of titles

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