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Lost Nottingham in Colour - cover

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Lost Nottingham in Colour

Ian Rotherham

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

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Summary

World famous because of its historic association with the iconic Sherwood Forest, Robin Hood and the Sheriff - Nottingham has been home to major industries too with Nottingham lace, bicycles, and Player's cigarettes notable in times past. Boasting two major universities, world-class theatres, and two professional football clubs, Nottingham also hosts the Nottinghamshire Cricket Club at Trent Bridge, and many other major sporting and leisure facilities. Nottingham folk are rightfully proud of their city, its lineage and their heritage. Lost Nottingham in Colour is richly illustrated with historic photographs, postcards, paintings and antique prints. These fascinating pictures capture the city in its various incarnations from the seventeenth century to the latter half of the nineteenth century.

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