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Codex Ocularis - cover

Codex Ocularis

Ian Pyper

Publisher: Pelekinesis

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Summary

The Log Book of a lone Astronaut/Psychonaut/Holonaut in a holographic exploration through space and time to an extremely large planet in the distant recesses of an unknown galaxy - resembling in many respects a human eye (named Ocularis). Mimetic in character, it has somehow focused its gaze on the Earth and its water and has consequently created weird and wonderful organisms in its vast internal fluid-filled centre.

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