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Going Coastal - A Journey Around the Whole Coastline of Britain by Whichever Road is Closest to the Ocean - cover

Going Coastal - A Journey Around the Whole Coastline of Britain by Whichever Road is Closest to the Ocean

Ian McBeath

Publisher: Ian McBeath

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Summary

In this book you will meet Kings and Queens, Vikings, Celtic priests, smugglers and the ordinary people of Britain. You will get to explore the history of castles, cathedrals and many of the towns and villages that collectively surround the coast and bind Britain into the nation it is today. 
In the early summer of 2016, the author set out on a quest to discover his roots by driving around the whole coastline of Britain.  What he found is a rich and beautiful land whose people have been shaped and influenced by the many invaders, who came either in force or in peace.  Their diverse origins and the impact they made are still very evident in the Britain of today.  Their influence is seen in language, accents and place names, but with the longest threads to the past being most notable in monarchy and religion. Ironically, the journey was during the time of the Brexit debate and vote, a significant event that will have a defining impact on Britain’s future history.

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