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Northern Borders - A Novel - cover

Northern Borders - A Novel

Howard Frank Mosher

Publisher: Mariner Books

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Summary

A New York Times Notable Book: A novel about growing up in a remote corner of Vermont, from the author Richard Russo calls “one of our very best writers.”   When six-year-old Austen Kittredge was sent up north to live on his grandparents’ farm in 1948, he didn’t know that he would spend the next twelve years of his life there—or that his remarkable stay would never leave him, no matter how far he traveled.   The farm in Lost Nation Hollow would become a magical place for Austen, full of eccentric people—like his stubborn but loving grandparents, whose marriage was known as the Forty Years War—wild adventures, and festering family secrets. An enchanting, startling coming-of-age novel, Northern Borders evokes a world of county fairs, heirloom quilts, and timber forests, in “a touching and unforgettable portrait of a people and time that are past” (Fannie Flagg, The New York Times Book Review).   “A contemporary classic . . . A complex, yet idyllic, story of childhood in Vermont.” —Los Angeles Times
Available since: 08/12/2014.
Print length: 304 pages.

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