Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Horace The Odes - New Translations by Contemporary Poets - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 1 million other books you can enjoy!

Horace The Odes - New Translations by Contemporary Poets

Horace

Publisher: Princeton University Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

They have inspired poets and challenged translators through the centuries. The odes of Horace are the cornerstone of lyric poetry in the Western world. Their subtlety of tone and brilliance of technique have often proved elusive, especially when--as has usually been the case--a single translator ventures to maneuver through Horace's infinite variety. Now for the first time, leading poets from America, England, and Ireland have collaborated to bring all 103 odes into English in a series of new translations that dazzle as poems while also illuminating the imagination of one of literary history's towering figures. The thirty-five contemporary poets assembled in this outstanding volume include nine winners of the Pulitzer prize for poetry as well as four former Poet Laureates. Their translations, while faithful to the Latin, elegantly dramatize how the poets, each in his or her own way, have engaged Horace in a spirited encounter across time. Each of the odes now has a distinct voice, and Horace's poetic achievement has at last been revealed in all its mercurial majesty. In his introduction, J. D. McClatchy, the volume's editor and one of the translators, reflects on the meaning of Horace through the ages and relates how a poet who began as a cynical satirist went on to write the odes. For the connoisseur, the original texts appear on facing pages allowing Horace's ingenuity to be fully appreciated. For the general reader, these new translations--all of them commissioned for this book--will be an exhilarating tour of the best poets writing today and of the work of Horace, long obscured and now freshly minted. The contributors are Robert Bly, Eavan Boland, Robert Creeley, Dick Davis, Mark Doty, Alice Fulton, Debora Greger, Linda Gregerson, Rachel Hadas, Donald Hall, Robert Hass, Anthony Hecht, Daryl Hine, John Hollander, Richard Howard, John Kinsella, Carolyn Kizer, James Lasdun, J. D. McClatchy, Heather McHugh, W. S. Mervin, Paul Muldoon, Carl Phillips, Robert Pinsky, Marie Ponsot, Charles Simic, Mark Strand, Charles Tomlinson, Ellen Bryantr Voigt, David Wagoner, Rosanna Warren, Richard Wilbur, C. K. Williams, Charles Wright, and Stephen Yenser.

Other books that might interest you

  • Coriolanus - cover

    Coriolanus

    William Shakespeare

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A classic performance of one of the Bard's classics.
    Show book
  • The Army of Death - cover

    The Army of Death

    Charles Hamilton Sorley

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Captain Sorley was among 16 Great War poets commemorated in Westminster Abbey's Poets' Corner. The inscription was written by Wilfred Owen. It reads: "My subject is War, and the pity of War. The Poetry is in the pity." This is regarded as one of Sorley's finest poems, and was discovered in his kit after his death. (Summary by Ruth Golding)
    Show book
  • The Poetry of Robert Herrick - cover

    The Poetry of Robert Herrick

    Robert Herrick

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The Clergyman and poet, Robert Herrick was born in Cheapside, in London in 1591. An exact date is not known though he was baptized on August 24th, the seventh child of Nicholas Herrick, a wealthy goldsmith.  
    Some controversy surrounds several chapters in his early years.  The first are allusions that his father, in November 1592, two days after making a will, killed himself by jumping from the fourth-floor window of his house. However, the Queen's Almoner did not confiscate the Herrick estate for the crown as was the usual procedure with suicides, so an alternate narrative emerged that he fell accidentally which seems to have more credence. 
    There is no record of Herrick attending school. Some claim a poem alludes to Westminster School, others merely that he meant Westminster, the area. Another school of thought claims he was educated at Merchant Taylor’s School.  What is known is that in 1607 he was apprenticed to his uncle Sir William Herrick as a goldsmith.   
    Herrick certainly seems to have been a keen and avid poet. The earliest work known to be written by him dates from 1610; 'A Country Life', and deals with the move from London to farm life in Leicestershire.  
    After six years as an apprentice, when Herrick was 22 he matriculated at St John’s College, Cambridge before moving to Trinity College and graduating with his Bachelor of Arts in 1617, Master of Arts in 1620, and in 1623 he was ordained priest.  
    By 1625 he was well known as a poet, mixing in literary circles in London such as that around Ben Jonson. An avowed admirer of Jonson he was also one of a group whom became known as ‘The Sons of Ben’ writing both in his style and about him. 
    In 1629 he was presented by Charles I to the parishioners of Dean Prior, a remote parish of Devonshire. The best of his work was written in the peace and seclusion of country life; 'To Blossoms' and 'To Daffodils' are classical depictions of a devoted appreciation of nature.  
    However, after he refused to subscribe to The Solemn League and Covenant, he was ejected from Devonshire in 1647 and moved to London where he published his religious poems Noble Numbers (1647), and Hesperides (1648). 
    Herrick was distinguished as a lyric poet, and some of his love songs, for example, 'To Anthea' and 'Gather Ye Rose-buds' are considered exceptional.  
    By 1660 he was reinstated at Dean Prior where he lived for the remainder of his life. He wrote no more poems after 1648 but over his life it is thought he wrote in the region of 2,500 poems in total, only a small portion of which were ever published. 
    He died in October 1674, at the age of 83 in circumstances unknown.  He was buried on October 15th, 1674 in an unmarked grave in the churchyard at Dean Prior. 
     This volume comes to you from Portable Poetry, a specialized imprint from Deadtree Publishing.  Our range is large and growing and covers single poets, themes, and many compilations.
    Show book
  • Short Poetry Collection 022 - cover

    Short Poetry Collection 022

    Various Various

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Librivox’s Short Poetry Collection 022: a collection of 20 public-domain poems.
    Show book
  • The Voysey Inheritance - cover

    The Voysey Inheritance

    Harley Granville-Barker

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In this surprisingly modern psychological portrait, a prosperous Edwardian family is torn apart when young Edward Voysey discovers that his family’s wealth was obtained through three generations of deceit and theft. A captivating study of turn-of-the-century morals. An L.A. Theatre Works full-cast performance featuring Suzan Crowley, Kenneth Danziger, Diana Douglas, Arabella Field, Robin Gammell, Paul Gutrecht, Arthur Hanket, Robert Machray, Christopher Neame, Judith Owen, Serena Scott Thomas and Paxton Whitehead.
    Show book
  • Sword Blades and Poppy Seed - cover

    Sword Blades and Poppy Seed

    Amy Lowell

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    This is a volume of poems by Amy Lowell, published in 1914."Against the multitudinous array of daily verse our times produce this volume utters itself with a range and brilliancy wholly remarkable. I cannot see that Miss Lowell's use of unrhymed 'vers libre' has been surpassed in English. Read 'The Captured Goddess', 'Music', and 'The Precinct. Rochester', a piece of mastercraft in this kind. A wealth of subtleties and sympathies, gorgeously wrought, full of macabre effects (as many of the poems are) and brilliantly worked out. The things of splendor she has made she will hardly outdo in their kind." (Josephine Preston Peabody, 'The Boston Herald', 1916)
    Show book