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The Algonquin Reader - Spring 2014 - cover

The Algonquin Reader - Spring 2014

Hill Algonquin Books of Chapel

Publisher: Algonquin Books

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Summary

Author essays and excerpts from forthcoming fiction by Michael Parker, Anthony De Sa, Gabrielle Zevin, Ellen Gilchrist, and Amy Rowland.A biannual publication for friends of Algonquin Books.

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