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Under the Old Roof - cover

Under the Old Roof

Hesba Stretton

Publisher: Hesba Stretton

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Summary

Hesba Stretton was the pen name of Sarah Smith (27 July 1832 – 8 October 1911), an English writer of children's books. She concocted the name from the initials of herself and four surviving siblings and part of the name of a Shropshire village she visited, All Stretton, where her sister Anne owned a house, Caradoc Lodge.

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