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Siddhartha (RSMediaItalia Nobel Collection) (Illustrated) - cover

Siddhartha (RSMediaItalia Nobel Collection) (Illustrated)

Hermann Hesse

Publisher: Hermann Hesse

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Summary

Hermann Hesse (2 July 1877—9 August 1962) was a German-Swiss poet, novelist, and painter. In 1946, he received the Nobel Prize in Literature. His best-known works include Steppen-wolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game (also known as Magister Ludi) which explore an individual's search for spiritu-ality outside society. Siddhartha is a 1922 novel by Hermann Hesse that deals with the spiritual journey of self-discovery of a man named Siddhartha during the time of the Gautama Buddha. The book, Hesse's ninth novel, was written in German, in a simple, lyrical style. It was published in the U.S. in 1951 and became influential during the 1960s.

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