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Malcolm Sage Detective - cover

Malcolm Sage Detective

Herbert George Jenkins

Publisher: e-artnow

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Summary

Detective Malcolm Sage has been compared to both HerculePoirot and Sherlock Holmes in his style of detective work.e-artnow presents to you this meticulously edited collection of Sage stories to help you indulge in the thrill of adventure and mystery. Contents:
Sir John Dene Receives His Orders
The Strange Case of Mr.Challoner
Malcolm Sage's Mysterious Movements
The Surrey Cattle-Maiming Mystery
Inspector Wensdale is Surprised
The Stolen Admiralty Memorandum
The Outrage at the Garage
Gladys Norman Dines with Thompson
The Holding Up of Lady Glanedale
A Lesson in Deduction
The Mcmurray Mystery
The Marmalade Clue
The Gylston Slander
Malcolm Sage Plays Patience
The Missing Heavyweight
The Great Fight at the Olympia
Lady Dene Calls on Malcolm Sage
Available since: 10/09/2020.
Print length: 194 pages.

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