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A Fly in a Pail of Milk - The Herb Carnegie Story - cover

A Fly in a Pail of Milk - The Herb Carnegie Story

Herb Carnegie

Publisher: ECW Press

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Summary

Revised and updated with commentary from Bernice Carnegie, Herb’s daughter, and life lessons passed from father to daughter 
		 
Herbert Carnegie was the complete hockey package in the 1940s and 1950s. Though his contributions to society both in sport and education have been referenced and profiled in books, documentaries, and thousands of articles, this is Carnegie’s own account of striving to break the glass ceiling, starting with his career as a professional hockey player on all-white teams. In 1978, noted hockey journalist Stan Fischler wrote a powerful headline about Carnegie: “Born Too Soon.” A Fly in a Pail of Milk reveals the feelings of a trailblazer — a man who proved to be unstoppable on the ice and in his resolve to make our world a better place.
		 
In this new edition, Herb’s daughter Bernice Carnegie shares stories about what it was like to work closely with Herb on youth and educational projects for more than 30 years. She also reflects on parts of her father’s writings, sharing personal thoughts, family stories, and conversations about how his journey profoundly influenced her life.

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