Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Ambassadors (Diversion Classics) - cover

The Ambassadors (Diversion Classics)

Henry James

Publisher: Diversion Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Featuring an appendix of discussion questions, the Diversion Classics edition is ideal for use in book groups and classrooms.
An intelligent man, though not worldy, Lewis Lambert Strethers leaves from Massachusetts to Paris devoted to a very serious goal. He is to rescue his formidable fiancée's wayward son, Chad, from the bankrupt influence the city has surely taken on him. Determined to bring him home, Strethers instead finds himself falling under the spell of Paris and the people he meets. Maria Gostrey, a remarkable, though forward woman, shows him Paris as no tour ever could. Bewitched by the charm and intellect of those he encounters, he begins to wonder if Paris does not corrupt but transform its people. 
Meeting Chad once more confirms his deepest suspicions. Chad, though living unconventionally, is all the better for his stay. Kinder, smarter, and more brilliant than ever before, the change in Chad stirs fear in Strethers about the man ever returning to Massachusetts.
Worse still, Strethers wonders if he can leave a city he's fallen in love with--or the woman who introduced him to it.
From the canonical author of The Turn of the Screw and The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors continues to cement James’s place at the forefront of literary realism.

Other books that might interest you

  • Don't Let the B*stards Get You Down - cover

    Don't Let the B*stards Get You Down

    Sam Dixon

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    When it feels like the world is against you and you want to give up on everything, here’s the perfect antidote: a no-nonsense collection of straight-talking quotations to help you laugh in the face of the bad times.
    Show book
  • Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook - cover

    Dogbert's Top Secret Management...

    Scott Adams

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Why do all modern managers do the same bizarre things? Are these methods taught in business schools? Do managers learn by watching more experienced managers? Is it the result of mentoring?  
     
    None of the above! 
     
    Every manager learns from the same source: Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook. This valuable management handbook teaches new managers how to transform themselves from bitter and bewildered "little people" into fully functioning, paradigm-spewing management zombies. 
     
    In this indispensable guide, Dogbert reveals the many vital skills needed by managers in their daily lives, including: 
     
    The power of verbal instructions-sound like a boss while                maintaining complete deniability!         
     
    Empty promises of promotion-enjoy all the motivational benefits                 with none of the costs!         
     
    Pretending to care-learn to hear without listening!         
     
    Company newsletter-communicate without the risk                 of conveying information!         
     
    Competition-experience the joy of setting your people against one another!         
     
    Decision making-be a leader without making any decisions!         
     
    Incentives-inspire employees by giving them worthless knick-knacks! 
     
    Remember: Leadership isn't something you're born with. It's something you learn by listening to Dogbert tapes. 
     
    A world-class consultant and bestselling author, Dogbert has spent much of his life giving advice to gullible people with disposable incomes. His brain has many more crevices than yours, so you'd better do what he says.
    Show book
  • A Day in the Life of Roger Angell - Parodies and Other Pleasures - cover

    A Day in the Life of Roger...

    Roger Angell

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Witty and deftly drawn parodies from a literary legendRoger Angell has a long history with the New Yorker: the son of fiction editor Katharine White and the stepson of E. B. White, Angell has spent decades writing and working for the magazine, to which he has contributed across genres and gained special renown for his essays on baseball. With A Day in the Life of Roger Angell, the author’s gifts as an urbane humorist come to the fore. The pieces here include two of Angell’s famous Christmas poems, parodies—of horoscopes, sports broadcasts, and Lawrence Durrell—and a tense correspondence over a short fiction contest that pays only in baked goods. Combined, these miniatures form a funny and charming chronicle of Manhattan life, as experienced both on the ground and in the city’s most literary circles. 
    Show book
  • The Non Sequitur Guide to "The System" - cover

    The Non Sequitur Guide to "The...

    Wiley Miller

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Wiley Miller’s e-book original The Non Sequitur Guide to "The System" skewers the ridiculousness of courtroom procedure, the deep-seated flaws of law and order, and the pomposity of bureaucrats. No one is safe as this objection to nonsensical judicial practice calls out every judge, jury, and executioner.Non Sequitur is Wiley Miller's wry look at the absurdities of  modern life. A hit with millions of fans, the strip is syndicated in  more than 700 newspapers. Non Sequitur has won four National  Cartoonists Society divisional awards, the most prestigious prize in  cartooning. It is the only comic strip to win the coveted award in its  first year of syndication and the only one to ever win in both the best  comic strip and best comic panel categories.
    Show book
  • American Lawyer in London An - cover

    American Lawyer in London An

    Brad Meltzer

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    (not far from a Werewolf) Originally published in Sunday Times in London, after the magazine asked Brad to compare American lawyers with British barristers. Wig-a-riffic!
    Show book
  • The Iron Bird - cover

    The Iron Bird

    Robert Woodshaw

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Forget pigs and carthorses and bring on the Big Beasts, because Animal Farm has been reimagined. This time it’s the creatures in the zoo that have decided to take back control. And instead of a parable about the evils of communism, the fable is the life of Margaret Thatcher. 
    It’s 2010, and Baroness Thatcher (a lappet-faced vulture) is losing it. And so she’s an unreliable narrator: grand, uncompromising, deluded. But before she drops off her perch, it’s time to set the record straight. What turned a grocer’s daughter from Grantham into the most powerful woman in the world? What put all that infamous iron into her soul? 
    And it’s also time to take a satirical swipe at other, more recent prime ministers. Who is the battle-scarred rhino caught in the glare of the spotlights? And why does he agree with Nick? What animal is David Cameron? And why would Lady Thatcher want to inspect some organ that has been inserted into the mouth of a pig? 
    ‘Hilarious – sometimes devastatingly so.’ – Lindsay Clarke, prize-winning author of The Chymical Wedding
    Show book