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Walden - cover

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Walden

Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Arcturus Publishing

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Summary

In 1845, Henry David Thoreau left his home in Concord, Massachusetts to live a contemplative life in the remote house that he built himself by the tranquil Walden Pond. Throughout his two years there, he diligently chronicled his observations.A positive and insightful look at human solitude, Walden remains a highly regarded work of transcendentalism, environmentalism, and individual enlightenment.

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