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Familiar Letters - The Writings of Henry David Thoreau - cover

Familiar Letters - The Writings of Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: White Press

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Summary

This is a collection of letters written by American naturalist Henry David Thoreau. Henry David Thoreau (1817 – 1862) was an American poet, philosopher, essayist, abolitionist, naturalist, development critic, and historian. He was also a leading figure in Transcendentalism, and is best known for his book “Walden”, a treatise on simple living in a natural environment. Other notable works by this author include: “The Landlord” (1843), “Reform and the Reformers” (1846–48), and “Slavery in Massachusetts” (1854). The letters in this volume are of a personal and intimate nature, and provide an unparalleled glimpse of both man and mind. “Familiar Letters” is highly recommended for fans of Thoreau's work, and it is not to be missed by the discerning collector. Contents include: “Years Of Discipline”, “Golden Age Of Achievement”, and “Friends And Followers”. Many vintage books such as this are becoming increasingly scarce and expensive. We are republishing this volume now in an affordable, modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially commissioned new biography of the author.

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