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Little Eyolf - cover

Little Eyolf

Henrik Ibsen

Translator William Archer

Publisher: Project Gutenberg

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Summary

Little Eyolf tells the story of the Allmer family. At the outset of the play, the father, Alfred, has just returned from a trip to the mountains. While there, he resolved to focus foremost on raising his son Eyolf, rather than continue work on his book, Human Responsibility. Eyolf, though described as having "beautiful, intelligent eyes,"[2] is paralyzed in one of his legs, and thus his life is a sheltered one. He craves more than anything else to live the life of a normal boy, but his father knows that this is not possible. As such, Alfred wants to turn Eyolf towards loftier, intellectual pursuits.

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