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Living at the Edge of Chaos: Complex Systems in Culture and Psyche - cover

Living at the Edge of Chaos: Complex Systems in Culture and Psyche

Helene Shulman

Publisher: Daimon

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Summary

Helene Shulman integrates experiences of synchronicity, altered states of consciousness, trance, ritual, Buddhist meditation practice and creativity into a broad perspective on cross-cultural psychology. What emerges is a comprehensive way to understand psychological illness and healing as a perpetual work-in-progress near “the edge of chaos,” where the seeds for new models of reality lie. 
With mental illness as the focus, she leads us on a fascinating interdisciplinary exploration, linking such areas as cultural studies, anthropology, evolutionary science and new work in mathematics and computer science – known as complexity theory – to Jungian psychology. 
A new paradigm for postmodern psychology emerges as the author presents a dynamic theoretical model containing rational and irrational aspects of individual and collective life. 
 
"The relevance of this work extends well beyond the field of psychology, for the author is describing the life experience of each of us in our personal and cultural milieu. The current states of our environmental, political and economic realities are presented as an urgent challenge to enter consciously into individual and community restoration work. Living at the edge of chaos, for all its apparent destruction, is nonetheless a source of spontaneity, creativity and hope." – Tuula Haukioja, Jungian analyst, Toronto

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