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The Story of My Life (Autobiography) - cover

The Story of My Life (Autobiography)

Helen Keller

Publisher: Musaicum Books

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Summary

The Story of My Life is Helen Keller's celebrated autobiography. It was published with the help of Anne Sullivan, Keller's famous teacher and Sullivan's husband, John Macy when Keller was merely 22 years of age. The book recounts the story of her life up to age 21 and was written during her time in college. It details her early life, struggles with her disability and her challenging learning experiences. Portions of it were adapted by William Gibson for a 1957 Playhouse 90 production, a 1959 Broadway play, a 1962 Hollywood feature film, and the Indian film Black. The book is dedicated to inventor Alexander Graham Bell. The dedication reads, "To Alexander Graham Bell who has taught the deaf to speak and enabled the listening ear to hear speech from the Atlantic to the Rockies, I dedicate this Story of My Life."

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