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Objects of Desire - The Eroticism of Touch - cover

Objects of Desire - The Eroticism of Touch

Hans-Jürgen Döpp

Publisher: Parkstone International

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Summary

Since humans first began thinking creatively – as opposed to merely procreatively – about sex, men and women have spiced up their love lives with this and that. Every civilization has come up with its own sex objects and sex toys. From rudimentarily-fashioned objects to the most exquisite ivory carvings of the Far East, eroticism has found expression in a multitude of different forms all displayed here. The beauty and the craftsmanship of these artistic masterpieces bear striking witness to the powers of generation in every culture throughout history. From works of art to sex toys, historian Hans-Jürgen Döpp analyses the complexities of human behaviour and the secret delights of those who own the little treasures featured in this book.

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