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Fragments of Memory (Czech) - From Kolin to Jerusalem - cover

Fragments of Memory (Czech) - From Kolin to Jerusalem

Hana Greenfield

Publisher: Gefen Publishing House

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Summary

In this powerfully moving account, the author, whose family lived in Kolin, Czechoslovakia, for many generations, shares episodes of her life during and after the Holocaust. Introduction by Vaclav Havel, President of Czech Republic. "The Diary of Anne Frank is now a part of the reading list. I would recommend Hana Greenfield's Fragments of Memory as a better book for young people because where Anne Frank's narrative stops, Greenfield's takes the reader into the heart of darkness and shows what life was in the death camps through the eyes of a teenager.
Journal of Czech and Slovak History Ruth David

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