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Hamlin Garland: 13 western novels - cover

Hamlin Garland: 13 western novels

Hamlin Garland

Publisher: Seltzer Books

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Summary

This book-collection file includes: Cavanagh's Forest Ranger, A Daughter of the Middle Border, The Eagle's Heart, The Forester's Daughter, A Little Norsk, Main-Travelled Roads, The Moccasin Ranch, Other Main-Traveled Roads, Prairie Folks, The Spirit of Sweetwater, A Spoil of Office, The Tyranny of the Dark, and Wayside Courtships.  According to Wikipedia: "Hannibal Hamlin Garland (September 14, 1860 – March 4, 1940) was an American novelist, poet, psychical researcher essayist, and short story writer. He is best known for his fiction involving hard-working Midwestern farmers."

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