Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
A Very French Christmas - The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time - cover

A Very French Christmas - The Greatest French Holiday Stories of All Time

Guy de Maupassant, Alphonse Daudet, Anatole France, François Coppée, Antoine Gustave Droz, Irène Némirovsky, Dominique Fabre, Jean-Phillippe Blondel, Paul Arène, Anatole Le Braz

Publisher: New Vessel Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Joyeux Noël: “[An]endearing collection of Christmas stories from ten of France’s most esteemed writers―past and present―skillfully translated.” ―Foreword Reviews   This collection brings together the best French Christmas stories of all time, featuring classics by Guy de Maupassant and Alphonse Daudet, plus stories by the esteemed twentieth century authors Irène Némirovsky and Nobel Prize winner Anatole France and contemporary writers Dominique Fabre and Jean-Philippe Blondel. With a holiday spirit conveyed through sparkling Paris streets, opulent feasts, wandering orphans, kindly monks, homesick soldiers, oysters, crayfish, ham, bonbons, flickering desire, and more than a little wine, this collection encapsulates Christmas à la française—delicious, intense and unexpected.
Available since: 10/10/2017.
Print length: 142 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Lady with the Dog - cover

    The Lady with the Dog

    Anton Chekhov

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov was born on 29th January 1860 in Taganrog, on the south coast of Russia.  
     
    His family life was difficult; his father was strict and over-bearing but his mother was a passionate story-teller, a subject Chekhov warmed to. As he later said; ‘our talents we got from our father, but our soul from our mother’.  
     
    At school Chekhov was distinctly average. At 16 his father mis-managed his finances and was declared bankrupt. His family fled to Moscow. Chekhov remained and eked out a living by various means, including writing and selling short sketches to newspapers, to finish his schooling. That completed and with a scholarship to Moscow University obtained he rejoined his family. 
     
    He was able to help support them by selling satirical sketches and vignettes of Russian lifestyles and gradually obtained further commissions. In 1884, he qualified as a physician and, although it earned him little, he often treated the poor for free, he was fond of saying ‘Medicine is my lawful wife, and literature is my mistress.’ 
     
    His own health was now an issue as he began to cough up blood, a symptom of tuberculosis.  Despite this his writing success enabled him to move the family into more comfortable accommodation.  
     
    Chekhov wrote over 500 short stories which included many, many classics including ‘The Kiss’ and ‘The Lady with a Dog’.  His collection ‘At Dusk’ won him the coveted Pushkin Prize when was only 26.  
     
    He was also a major playwright beginning with the huge success of ‘Ivanov’ in 1887.   
     
    In 1892 Chekhov bought a country estate north of Moscow. Here his medical skills and money helped the peasants tackle outbreaks of cholera and bouts of famine. He also built three schools, a fire station and a clinic.  It left him with less time for writing but the interactions with real people gained him detailed knowledge about the peasantry and their living conditions for his stories.  
     
    His most famous work, ‘The Seagull’ was received disastrously at its premiere in St Petersburg. It was later restaged in Moscow to highlight its psychological aspects and was a huge success. It led to ‘Uncle Vanya’, ‘The Three Sisters’ and ‘The Cherry Orchard’.  
     
    Chekhov suffered a major lung hemorrhage in 1897 while visiting Moscow. A formal diagnosis confirmed tuberculosis and the doctors ordered changes to his lifestyle.  
     
    Despite a dread of weddings the elusive literary bachelor quietly married the actress Olga Knipper, whom he had met at rehearsals for ‘The Seagull’, on 25th May 1901. 
     
    By May 1904 with his tuberculosis worsening and death imminent he set off for the German town of Badenweiler writing cheerful, witty letters to his family and assuring them his health was improving.  
     
    On 15th July 1904 Anton Chekhov died at Badenweiler.  He was 44.
    Show book
  • The Stranger - cover

    The Stranger

    Richard Rogers

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A stranger emerges out of a brilliant dawn. His appearance is rough and dangerous. His touch starts to change the world. 
    A factory breaks down and the sea erupts. A prisoner escapes and runs to his victim. A youth is stopped with her knife. A Covid nurse drags herself from her shift. A young woman faces pregnancy while an old man faces death. And the town where they all live is being ripped apart. 
    Some of the people are happy, while others are scared. Is the stranger there for good or bad? And is everything all as it seems?
    Show book
  • Gothic Tales of Terror Volume 8 - cover

    Gothic Tales of Terror Volume 8

    Mark Twain, Robert Louis...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    GOTHIC TALES OF TERROR - VOLUME 8. This collection of short stories contains several gothic tales to bear macabre and chilling witness to writers as diverse as Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, Jerome K Jerome and Edgar Allan Poe. These tales are designed to unsettle you, just a little, as you sit back, and take in their words as they lead  you on a walk to places you’d perhaps rather not visit on your own.   Our stories are A Ghost Story by Mark Twain, Ollah by Robert Louis Stevenson, The Doctor’s Story by Jerome K Jerome and Murders In The Rue Morgue By Edgar Allan Poe. These stories are read for you by many readers including Hubert Gregg and Stuart Milligan.
    Show book
  • A Study in Scarlet - Classic Tales Edition - cover

    A Study in Scarlet - Classic...

    Arthur Conan Doyle

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Dr. John Watson and Sherlock Holmes meet and set up their lodgings at 221B Baker St. Over the course of several weeks, the good doctor finally persuades his mysterious roommate to reveal what exactly is his occupation. It seems that Sherlock Holmes is a self-proclaimed consulting detective. And as incredible as it sounds, the facts prove it to be true. A Study in Scarlet is the first Sherlock Holmes story/novella. Also included is the Edgar Allan Poe story: "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", generally considered the very first detective story. In this audiobook you get a firsthand glimpse into the very roots of detective fiction.
    Show book
  • Thirst - A Nepal Short Story - cover

    Thirst - A Nepal Short Story

    Merryn Glover

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    When the water runs out at the village tap, a woman's kindness to a stranger yields a miracle.
    Show book
  • Why Herbert Killed His Mother - cover

    Why Herbert Killed His Mother

    Winifred Holtby

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Winifred Holtby (1898-1935) was an English novelist, short story writer and journalist. 'Why Herbert Killed His Mother' is the story of a perfect baby who wins a beautiful baby contest and becomes a tiny celebrity, bringing fame and fortune to his family. When Herbert grows up, he spends most of his life trying to leave 'Baby Herbert' behind him...but his mother cannot quite relinquish the glory days when she was hailed as the perfect mother.
    Show book