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The Crowd - A Study of the Popular Mind - cover

The Crowd - A Study of the Popular Mind

Gustave Le bon

Publisher: SMK Books

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Summary

The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind is a brilliant treatise on the workings of crowds. Gustave Le Bon examines many different kinds of crowds and how they work. He differentiates between different kinds of crowds such as mobs, juries, elected bodies, and simple crowds. This landmark book is one of the most influential books ever written on this subject. An important book for anyone studying or working in the fields of sociology, law, and psychology.

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