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7 best short stories - Work - cover

7 best short stories - Work

Gustave Flaubert, George Gissing, O. Henry, Anton Chekhov, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, James Joyce, August Nemo

Publisher: Tacet Books

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Summary

Money - and the social effects of having it or not - is too big a theme in people's daily lives to be ignored by literature. The writers gave the most varied interpretations and looked from the most different angles to the human relationship with money - but the final thought is always up to the reader.
The critic August Nemo selected seven classic short stories on this subject:

- Counterparts by James Joyce
- The Romance of a Busy Broker by O. Henry
- Sleepy by Anton Chekhov
- Neighbour Rosicky by Willa Cather
- An Old Maid's Triumph by George Gissing
- The Egg by Sherwood Anderson
- A Simple Soul by Gustave Flaubert
For more books with interesting themes, be sure to check the other books in this collection!

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