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Sonnets and Ballate of Guido Cavalcanti - cover

Sonnets and Ballate of Guido Cavalcanti

Guido Cavalcanti

Translator Ezra Pound

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

Guido Cavalcanti's 'Sonnets and Ballate' offers a profound exploration of love, desire, and spirituality through the use of intricate poetic forms. Known for his intellectual approach to love poetry, Cavalcanti delves into the complexities of human emotions with a keen sense of introspection. The sonnets showcase his mastery of language, while the ballate display his ability to capture the beauty and melancholy of unrequited love. This collection exemplifies the Dolce Stil Novo literary movement, illustrating a sophisticated and refined style of writing from the late 13th century. Readers will appreciate the depth and complexity of Cavalcanti's verse, as well as his unique perspective on the themes of love and passion. Guido Cavalcanti, a prominent figure in the Italian literary scene, was a close friend and influence on Dante Alighieri. His philosophical approach to poetry and distinctive style have cemented his legacy as one of the great poets of his time. Cavalcanti's personal experiences and intellectual pursuits undoubtedly shaped his poetic vision, leading to the creation of 'Sonnets and Ballate.' I highly recommend 'Sonnets and Ballate of Guido Cavalcanti' to readers interested in delving into the rich tradition of Italian love poetry. This collection is a timeless exploration of the complexities of human emotions and a testament to Cavalcanti's enduring impact on the literary world.
Available since: 04/10/2021.
Print length: 26 pages.

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