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And the Wind Sees All - cover

And the Wind Sees All

Guđmundur Andri Thorsson

Translator Andrew Cauthery, Björg Árnadóttir

Publisher: Peirene Press

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Summary

Relaxing Nordic hygge in a novel; the entire story takes place in two minutes.In this story we hear the voices of an Icelandic fishing village. On a summer’s day a young woman in a polka-dot dress cycles down the main street. Her name is Kata and she is the village choir conductor. As she passes, we glimpse the members of the village: a priest with a gambling habit, an old brother and sister who have not talked for years, and a sea captain who has lost his son. But perhaps the most interesting story of all belongs to the young woman on the bicycle. Why is she reticent to talk about her past?Why Peirene chose to publish this book:Reading this book was like embarking on a gentle journey – with music in my ears and wind in my hair. Yes, there is some darkness in the tales, and not every character is happy. But the story is told with such empathy that I couldn’t help but smile and forgive the flaws that make us human.'A heart-warming gem of a novel' David Mills, The Sunday Times'An exceptional novel, full of music, sun and longing’Fréttablaðið

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