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A History Lover's Guide to Lincoln - cover

A History Lover's Guide to Lincoln

Gretchen M. Garrison

Publisher: The History Press

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Summary

A neighborhood-by-neighborhood tour of the Cornhusker State’s capital city by an author who “is a wealth of Nebraska knowledge” (Oh My! Omaha). 
 
Dramatic change accompanied Lincoln’s growth from a village of 30 settlers to a city of 300,000. Today, Lincoln retains the residue of its fascinating past for those who know where to look. Tour Lincoln’s storied heritage by charting the arrival of the university, penitentiary, asylum and railroads. Learn how the early churches still anchor the community. Discover the five towns that later merged into Lincoln. Visualize the artwork that best reflects Lincoln—both the person and city. Locate where Lindbergh learned to fly. Revisit the downtown Lincoln scene of what was once the largest bank robbery in the United States. Picture the once thriving Capitol Beach Amusement Park. Explore Nebraska’s capital city in the expert company of Gretchen M. Garrison.

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