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Courageous Journey - Through Poetry - cover

Courageous Journey - Through Poetry

Gregory Welch

Publisher: La Maison Publishing, Inc.

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Summary

In 2008 I was hit by a car while attending Hofstra University. This event altered my life forever. I was rushed to the hospital listed as “likely to die”. After multiple neurosurgeries, treatments, and prayers from family and friends, I awoke from my coma. Thus began my journey of Recovery.                
 
I wrote Courageous Journey anywhere and everywhere; visiting family, in waiting rooms, during car rides, early in the morning, late at night, even on the elevator, you name it. It was all a suitable place to practice my craft. I write to share my thoughts and feelings, struggles, and successes with some humor mixed in because what is life without laughter?

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