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An Essay on Comedy and the Uses of the Comic Spirit - cover

An Essay on Comedy and the Uses of the Comic Spirit

George Meredith

Publisher: Charles River Editors

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Summary

George Meredith was an English novelist and poet during the Victorian era. Meredith was a prolific writer and he stood out as one of the great authors of comedy of his time.  With classics such as The Egoist, Diana of the Crossways, and The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, Meredith remains a popular author today.

An Essay on Comedy and the Uses of the Comic Spirit, published in 1877, is an influential work on comic theory.

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