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Guild Court - cover

Guild Court

George MacDonald

Publisher: RosettaBooks

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Summary

A Dickensian novel of London society and of a man who breathes spiritual life into his surroundings—from the Victorian-era author of Robert Falconer.   Following on the heels of Robert Falconer’s hugely influential and controversial story, Guild Court, written concurrently with Falconer and published the same year, is one of MacDonald’s lesser known novels. A love story set in London, its portrait of many intertwining and quirky lives in and around a city court is perhaps the most Dickens-like of MacDonald’s novels. Though not a book that enjoyed such widespread circulation as his others, Guild Court yet contains many of the signature tunes found throughout George MacDonald’s fictional corpus, and presents a powerful story of repentance, forgiveness, and reconciliation.

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