Discover new books each day!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Caesar and Cleopatra - cover

Caesar and Cleopatra

George Bernard Shaw

Publisher: Charles River Editors

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

George Bernard Shaw was a prolific Irish playwright who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1925.  Shaw’s famous plays include Man and Superman and Pygmalion which was adapted into the classic musical My Fair Lady.  This edition of Caesar and Cleopatra includes a table of contents.

Other books that might interest you

  • Visualizing Equality - African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century - cover

    Visualizing Equality - African...

    Aston Gonzalez

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The fight for racial equality in the nineteenth century played out not only in marches and political conventions but also in the print and visual culture created and disseminated throughout the United States by African Americans. Advances in visual technologies--daguerreotypes, lithographs, cartes de visite, and steam printing presses--enabled people to see and participate in social reform movements in new ways. African American activists seized these opportunities and produced images that advanced campaigns for black rights. In this book, Aston Gonzalez charts the changing roles of African American visual artists as they helped build the world they envisioned. 
      
    Understudied artists such as Robert Douglass Jr., Patrick Henry Reason, James Presley Ball, and Augustus Washington produced images to persuade viewers of the necessity for racial equality, black political leadership, and freedom from slavery. Moreover, these activist artists' networks of transatlantic patronage and travels to Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa reveal their extensive involvement in the most pressing concerns for black people in the Atlantic world. Their work demonstrates how images became central to the ways that people developed ideas about race, citizenship, and politics during the nineteenth century.
    Show book
  • The True Story Behind Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho - Stranger Than Fiction #1 - cover

    The True Story Behind Alfred...

    Fergus Mason

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    For movie buffs Alfred Hitchcock will always be associated with a long list of Hollywood classics. Between 1921 and 1976 the English director known as the Master of Suspense released 52 feature films, many of which are still thrilling new audiences today. To most people, though, he's best known for a film that was very different – Psycho. 
     
    The most fascinating part of the movie, however, is actually the real story behind it. This book tells the chilling true story behind of the movie.
    Show book
  • The Sapphire Affair: The True Story Behind Alfred Hitchcock's Topaz - Stranger Than Fiction #4 - cover

    The Sapphire Affair: The True...

    Fergus Mason

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The truth is stranger than fiction! 
     
    In October 1962 it looked to millions of people like the politicians of the United States and Russia were determined to push the other across the fatal line of launching a nuclear strike. The fate of the world hung on Cuba, a troubled island state in the Caribbean. 
     
    Woven through the dramatic events in and around Cuba was a quieter but perhaps equally dangerous scandal – an enormous, deeply embedded network of Soviet spies at the heart of the NATO alliance. A senior KGB defector had revealed that his agency had penetrated the highest levels of the French government, military, and intelligence services – but when a French agent tried to act he found himself blocked at every turn by his own superiors. 
     
    Alfred Hitchcock was so impressed by the fictional novel about the events (Topaz by Leon Uris) that he decided to adapt it into a movie. But fiction, as is often the case, only got half of the story.  
     
    This book tells the remarkable true account of one of the greatest espionage scandals to rock the Cold War.
    Show book
  • The True Story Behind Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds - Stranger Than Fiction #2 - cover

    The True Story Behind Alfred...

    Fergus Mason

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Birds was different from most of Hitchcock's work.  
     
    For admirers of Hitchcock, The Birds also raises disturbing questions about the director as a person. He was a complex and confusing character in many ways, and perhaps it's not surprising that someone who built a career out of creating suspense and fear on-screen might also have had some darker sides to his personal life. 
     
    Beyond the details of the story and how it came to be filmed, though, one of the most interesting questions about The Birds is why Hitchcock made it in the first place. It took its title from a short story by English author Daphne du Maurier, but beyond the basic idea of people being attacked by birds, it didn't take much else from it. The storyline was pure Hitchcock. So where did it come from? 
     
    It turns out that his inspiration was a strange and alarming incident that happened just a few miles from his home in California.  
     
    This book uncovers the truth behind the plot as well as other factoids that fascinate any fan of the film.
    Show book
  • The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle - cover

    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

    J. A. Giles, J. Ingram

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of annals in Old English chronicling the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The original manuscript of the Chronicle was created late in the 9th century, probably in Wessex, during the reign of Alfred the Great (r. 871–899). Multiple copies were made of that one original and then distributed to monasteries across England, where they were independently updated. In one case, the Chronicle was still being actively updated in 1154.
    
    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is an invaluable resource for anyone studying the history of England. It is definitely not light reading, but it is filled with fascinating and intriguing details of life in England before to just after the Norman Conquest.
    
    Michael Swanton's edition of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a good, handy reference in modern English. A group of manuscripts (eight in all) rather than a single unified book, the Chronicle is the first continuously-maintained vernacular national historical work in Western history. Swanton has here translated and edited the manuscripts to form a continuous whole, and included extensive notes.
    
    A good successor to Garmonsway's parallel translation of the various Chronicle texts - good translation, ample notes, solid introduction. It also has good maps and supplementary material for the history.
    Show book
  • The True Story Behind Alfred Hitchcock's The Wrong Man - Stranger Than Fiction #6 - cover

    The True Story Behind Alfred...

    Fergus Mason

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Read the shocking real stroy behind Hitchcock's classic film! 
     
    The Wrong Man tells the incredible tale of an innocent man falsely accused of a crime. That in itself is hardly an unusual story, but in this case, a string of unlikely coincidences and sheer bad luck built a seemingly airtight case against him.  
     
    It seemed that the entire justice system was deaf to his pleas and all too willing to ignore the evidence his defenders had worked so hard to unearth. In the end, it was only a slip by the real perpetrator that proved his innocence. 
    While the movie certainly had its share of truth, it was still a movie, and parts were fabricated.  
     
    This book tells the real story behind the movie.
    Show book